Charles O'Grady

Playwright, poet, journalist, ghost of theatre future

Are We Awake?

“I was really hoping you’d find a way to wear the blue one for the trip there. Least for some of it. I bought it for you because it has clouds on it and you’d be able to wear it while you were in the clouds, and then if disaster struck and the plane went into freefall you’d just float with it because you’d be a cloud too.”

In a tiny one bedroom apartment, at five thirty in the morning, a young couple sits on the cusp of a day that will change their lives. Faced with the spectre of financial instability, Endymion (Aleks Mikic) must relocate for work, leaving his chronically ill boyfriend, Hypnos (Daniel Monks), to fend for himself. Questions of going or staying, breaking up or hanging on, and what is real or imagined, plague these two young men as they fight to keep their grasp on “normal”.

This new work by up-and-coming queer theatre-maker Charles O’Grady (Kaleidoscope, Telescope) is a tender and human take on the complex relationship between queerness and disability.

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CAST & CREW

28 FEB – 11 MARCH, THE OLD FITZ THEATRE
AS PART OF THE NEW FITZ EMERGING WRITERS PROGRAM

ENDYMION – Aleks Mikic
HYPNOS – Daniel Monks

Director – Sean Hawkins
Producer – Vanessa Wright
Designer – Brodie Simpson
Sound Design – Tom Hogan
Lighting Design – Tom Walsh
Stage Manager – Eden Fordham

Dedicated to Robin, Margot, Lawrence, and Bellatrix,
For loving me even though we’re all (literally) falling to pieces.

With thanks to

Angus Cerini
Rachel Chant
Georgia Cranko
Declan Greene
Mark Tripodi
Playwriting Australia
The cast and creative team of “The Homosexuals, or Faggots”

Reviews and Media

“There is great sensitivity in O’Grady’s writing, with remarkable depth in his imagining of characters for this sentimental, and very angsty, two-hander.” – Suzy Goes See

“It’s not often theatre deals with chronic illness in such a direct and earnest way. Are We Awake is a visceral, emotional play that refuses to skirt around issues and relationship dynamics largely left unexplored in other works.” – Sam Baran for The Music

 

 

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